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COMBAT

Combat Modifiers

Situation

Modifier

Aimed shot

-1 per turn aiming

Wounds

+1 per level

Glare

+1

Semi-dark, 25% cover

+21

Twilight, 50% cover

+31

Full dark, Blind fire

+5

Thermographic Vision

+22

Attacker/Target Walking3

+1

Attacker/Target Running3

+2

Attacker/Target Sprinting3

+3

Attacking from Vehicle to Foot/Foot to Vehicle

+1 per 10km/h

Attacking from Vehicle to Vehicle

+1 per 10km/h difference

Called Shot

+3

Two Weapons

+2 to both Targets

1 – Lighting modifiers do not affect Low-Light vision.

2 – Replaces any visibility modifiers.

3 – add half of the lower penalty (rounded up) if the two parties are moving at different speeds.  For example, Giga is walking through a warehouse when his prey leaps out from behind a crate and sprints for the exit.  Because Giga is walking, the penalty is (3+½=3½, rounded up to) +4.

 

There is also the matter of ranges.  We’ve been fairly generic here, too.

Weapon Type

Range (Target)

Short (4)

Medium (6)

Long (9)

Extreme (12)

Pistol**

5

15

30

60

Normal Rifle***

100

200

300

400

Shotgun

10

30

60

120

SMG

10

40

80

150

Sniper Rifle

150

300

600

1000

LMG

75

150

300

500

MMG

80

160

400

600

HMG/ Minigun

100

200

400

600

** - Includes under-barrel Grenade Launchers

*** - Includes Grenade Launchers and Pistols

 

Other Firearm Notes

Modes

Each firearm has a number of modes; generally, the more lethal and complicated the weapon, the more modes it will have.

Single Shot (SS)

Single shot firearms have to be cocked after each shot.  This includes six-shooter pistols, pump-action shotguns and bolt-action hunting and sniper rifles.  To compensate for this slowness, most SS-mode weapons do a bit more damage than their faster compatriots.  When the character fires a SS weapon, if the first card out is a black, they must spend the next turn cocking the weapon again; if it is red, then they may fire in the next turn as well.

Semi-Automatic (SA)

Semi-automatic firearms automatically cock after each round is fired.  It is the most common mode for firearms.  They shoot once per turn.

Burst-Fire (BF)

Burst-fire weapons can fire three bullets in the space of one turn.  It is common among rifles, and rare among pistols and shotguns.  Firing in BF mode makes the character subject to the Rule of Three Ones (See below).  BF mode attacks cannot be Called Shots.

Full Auto (FA)

Also known as ‘lead rain’, FA weapons can fire a large number of bullets, usually 6-10, in the space of one turn.  It is normally reserved for machine guns and some military assault rifles.  Firing in FA mode makes the character subject to the Rule of Three Ones (See below).  FA mode attacks cannot be Called Shots.

 

Rule of Three Ones

When firing more than one bullet in a turn, the attack is calculated differently: every three bullets (or part thereof) fired add one card to the character’s draw for that shot, one point to the base Damage pf the weapon, and one to the Target.

Jilly, with Rifles: 3, has a H&K G11, a revolutionary rifle that fires 4.7mm caseless ammunition (Damage: 4Y).  It is capable of firing in both BF and FA modes.  When Jilly fires in BF mode, she gets to draw 4 cards (3+1 for the burst), with a +1 penalty to the Target, and for Damage of 5Y per success.  If she fires in FA mode, she gets to draw 6 cards (3+3 for the burst), with a +3 to the Target, with a whopping 7Y damage per success.

The penalty to the Target can be nullified by recoil compensation, like a stock, gyromount, gas venting systems, or similar devices.

 

Recoil Compensation

Recoil Compensation is anything that counters the rearward and upward forces generated by firing a bullet.  It can be anything from shock-absorbing pads mounted on the handle of the weapon, to a shoulder stock or bipod, to a full-body gyro-stabilised harness.  Whatever form the compensation takes, its function is to absorb the shock of firing, which they do to varying degrees of success.

Compensation Type

Typical Compensation

Shock-pads

1-2 points

Shoulder-stock

2 points

Gas Vent systems

1-3 points

Bipod

2 points

Tripod

3 points

Gyromount

3-6 points

 

Dodge This: Missile combat

1.    Determine Reaction.

2.    The first shooter draws against the appropriate skill with the Target being: Point Blank – 2; Short – 4; Medium – 6; Long – 9; Extreme – 12.  Visibility modifiers may apply.

3.    Each success causes the amount of damage listed with the weapon.  For example, three successes with a 3G weapon will cause 9 points of Green damage.

4.    If the shot hits, then the target’s armour takes over.  Armour has a Damage reduction value for each type of damage, listed in the order Ballistic/Blade/Impact/Heat.  Some more rigid armour-types also have Level reduction, added as stars to the type of damage they reduce.  If this applies to Ballistic damage, then the level of the damage is reduced (usually from Yellow to Green, or Red to Yellow).  After this, the Damage reduction is subtracted from the total damage done, and the resulting damage is recorded against the character’s Wound tallies.

5.    If the target moves across a Damage Level in one hit (from green to yellow, or example), then their armour receives 1 point of Wear.  They must also make a knockdown test: draw one card, and if it is less than twice the character’s Size, then they stay upright.  If not, then they fall over, and must spend the next turn getting up.  Opponents must make the test each time they move across damage levels; if they receive multiple wounds in a round, then they must make a test each time it happens (although after the first two, they probably won’t have to worry about many more...)

WEAPON MASTER LIST

FIREARMS

Pistols

Name

Ammo

Damage

Modes

R/C

Conceal

Load

Beretta Model 81

12

2Y

SA

0

9

60

Beretta Model 93R

20

2Y

SA/BF

1

8

150

Browning High-Power

13

2Y

SA

0

9

65

Glock 22

15

2Y

SA

0

9

75

H&K VP70M

18

2Y

SA/BF

0

8

110

H&K VP70Z

18

2Y

SA

0

8

90

H&K HK4

8

3Y

SA

0

9

50

Desert Eagle

8

3Y

SA

0

7

50

Ruger Blackhawk

6

3Y

SS

0

6

50

Ruger Redhawk

6

4Y

SS

0

6

60

S&W Model 29

6

4Y

SS

0

5

60

USSR PSM

8

3Y

SA

0

9

50

Walther PP

8

2Y

SA

0

9

50

Magnus Arms Bulldog

6

2Y

SS

0

10

40

Grenade Pistol

6

Grenade

SS

0

7

60

 

RIFLES

Name

Ammo

Damage

Modes

R/C

Load

Beretta SC70

30

4Y

SA/BF/FA

3

195

CZ vz/58

30

2R

SA/BF/FA

3

205

Enfield L39A1

10

2R

SS

0

25

Enfield XM-70

30

4Y

SA/BF/FA

3

195

FN-FAL

20

2R

SA/BF

2

110

FN-FNC

30

4Y

SA/BF/FA

3

195

Galil AR

35

4Y

SA/BF/FA

3

207

H&K G11

50

2R

SA/BF/FA

3

255

H&K G41

30

4Y

SA

0

75

H&K HK33E

26

4Y

SA/BF

2

115

Kalashnikov AK-47

30

2R

SA/BF/FA

3

205

Kalashnikov AKM

100

2R

SA/BF/FA

3

380

Remington 552a

20

4Y

SA/BF

2

100

Remington 66MB

14

4Y

SA

0

35

Ruger AC-556

20

4Y

SA/BF

2

100

H&K PSG-1 (Sniper)*

20

2R

SA

0

160

Steyr SSG-69 (Sniper)*

10

2R

SS

0

125

Steyr AUG

30

4Y

SA/BF

2

125

Fallenberg 'Bird-chaser'

6

2R

SA

0

35

* - Sniper rifles are a little different from ordinary rifles.  Firstly, they are designed to make difficult shots.  Ergo, all Called Shots made with a Sniper Rifle is at +1, not +3.  Secondly, it generates 2 points of recoil per shot, but it comes with a bipod, which offsets the recoil.  If it is used without the bipod, then draw one card whenever it is fired.  On a 5 or less, the barrel is knocked out of alignment, and it is useless until someone repairs it (Repair (Rifles) draw against a Target of 7).

 

SHOTGUNS

Name

Ammo

Damage

Modes

R/C

Load

Franchi SPAS-11

8

1R

SA/BF

0

190

Franchi SPAS-12

8

2R

SA/BF

1

220

HK CAWS

10

2R

SA/BF/FA

3

320

Ithaca LAPD Model

5

2R

SS

0

125

S&W 3000 Police

8

2R

SS

0

140

Fallenberg FB10

10

1R

SA

0

150

 

SUBMACHINE GUNS

Name

Ammo

Damage

Modes

R/C

Conceal

Load

FN P-90

50

3Y

SA/BF/FA

4

N/A

270

VZ61 Skorpion

20

2Y

SA/BF

2

7

75

Steyr TMP

30

2Y

SA/BF/FA

1

7

120

H&K MP5

30

2Y

SA/BF/FA

2

N/A

150

Uzi

24

2Y

BF/FA

3

N/A

105

Ingram Model 10

30

2Y

SA/BF

2

7

100

Spectre

50

2Y

SA/BF/FA

4

N/A

260

Todhunter Arms 66

66

3Y

SA/BF/FA

3

7

280

 

Heavy Weapons

Name

Ammo

Damage

Modes

R/C

Load

MMG (Burst of 15)

60

4Y

BF/FA

4

350

HMG (Burst of 20)

60

1R

BF/FA

4

450

Minigun (Burst of 30)

Belt

2Y

FA

6

600

 

Grenades (Impact Damage)

Type

Blast

Damage

Other Effects

Load

Regular

5m

3R

None

10

Anti-Personnel

5m

Special

3R damage to unarmoured targets, 3Y to all else.

20

Concussion

5m

3G

Anyone caught in blast is at +4 for hearing Targets until healed.

15

Flash

10m

None

Draw versus Dexterity; blinded for (4-successes) rounds.

10

Flash-bang

10m

3Y

Combination Flash and Concussion grenade

25

Gas

N/a

N/a

Draw versus Size; all in area rendered unconscious for (4-successes) rounds.  Lasts for three rounds.

20

Smoke

N/a

N/a

All targets for vision-based skills are increased by 3.  Lasts for three rounds.

20

 

Close Combat

Close combat can either involve weapons, or bare hands.  A character using Size or Dexterity causes (Size) stun damage with their bare hands, and a person using Martial Arts causes damage equal to their Size or Dexterity Attribute plus their Martial Arts Skill rating.  All open-hand attacks are resisted with Impact Armour, with a Damage level of Green.

Each type of weapon, gun or close-combat, has a Conceal value.  This is how easy it is to spot the item in a visual search of the body.  The searcher makes an Intuition draw against the Conceal of the item; if they gain one success, the item is spotted.  Some types of clothing, particularly larger types, can add to an item’s Conceal when placed beneath them.

Weapons are a more permanent way of settling a martial contest.  There are five basic types of weapon: Blade, Axe, Club, Pole and Whip.  All Melee Combat weapons have a Damage Code of Yellow.

Blade (Blade Damage)

Name

Damage

Conceal

Katana

S+2

5

Long-blade knife

S

8

Sai

S-1

9

Short-Blade knife (Aerodynamic)

S-2 (S+D÷3)

10

Combat Knife (Aerodynamic)

S+1 (S+D÷2)

8

Sword

S+2

6

Wakizashi

S+1

7

Axe (Blade Damage)

Name

Damage

Conceal

Axe

S+1

7

Hatchet (Aerodynamic)

S-1 (S+D-4)

8

Machete

S

7

Skeleton Axe

S

9

Club (Impact damage)

Name

Damage

Conceal

Mace

S+1

6

Nightstick

S

8

Collapsible Baton

S

10/8

Billy Club (Aerodynamic)

S (S+D÷2)

8

Pole

Name

Damage

Conceal

Retractable Staff

S-1 (Impact)

6/2

Spear (Aerodynamic)

S (Blade)

2

Staff

S-1 (Impact)

2

Whip

Name

Damage

Conceal

Bullwhip (Entangle*)

S-2 (Blade)

8

Nunchaku

S+1 (Impact)

8

Three-piece-rod

S+2 (Impact)

6

Note: S=Size.  S+D=Size plus Dexterity, used when throwing the weapon.

Entangle: if a character makes an attack with a weapon that Entangles, they may call a shot (+3 to the TN) to one of the character’s extremities.

Shot to:

Effect

Head

Tangled around the opponent’s neck; automatically inflicts 1 draw of Green damage until they are freed from it.

Arm

Immobilises that arm; character may not use it until freed.

Leg

Immobilises the opponent; character may not move unless they free themselves.

In order to free oneself, the entangled person must make either a Dexterity test with a Target of 10 (to slip the bonds), or a Size test with a Target of 12 (to break the offending restraints).  In the latter case, the weapon is destroyed on a successful test.

 

Thrown and Propelled Weapons

Attacks with thrown and propelled weapons (with the exception of Grenades – see above) are resolved in the same way as Firearm attacks.

Crossbows are crafted according to Ratings, to reflect the tautness of the pull, and the power of the action.  A character must have a Size Attribute equal to the Rating to be able to use the crossbow.

All thrown/propelled weapons have a Mode of SA, with the exception of the Crossbow, which must be re-cocked every round after it has been fired.

Weapon Type

Range (Metres)

Base Damage (Yellow damage)

Short

Medium

Long

Extreme

Thrown – small*

Size

Size×3

Size×6

Size×10

S+D÷2 (Blade)

Thrown – large**

Size

Size×2

Size×4

Size×6

1+(S+D÷2) (Blade)

Pull Bow

Size

Size×10

Size×20

Size×40

Size-1 (Blade)

Crossbow

Rating×5

Rating×20

Rating×40

Rating×60

(Rating)+1 (Blade)

Sling

Size×4

Size×8

Size×10

Size×15

S+D÷2 (Impact)

Blowpipe

Size×2

Size×5

Size×10

Size×20

S+D÷3 (Blade)

* includes knives, shiruken, and darts.

** includes throwing axes, spears, billy-clubs (Impact damage) and grenades (ranges only).

 

Close Combat:

1.    Determine Reaction as per usual.

2.    The two combatants draw against the skill they are using (Brawling, Martial Arts, or Armed Combat), with the Target of 6 plus the opponent’s Armour Value against that type of attack (generally Impact or Blade).  Open-Hand attacks are resisted with Impact armour.

3.    Whoever has the most amount of successes does the damage to the other person.  A tie indicates a stand-off, and nothing happens.

4.    The processes of calculating and resisting damage are the same as missile combat.  The only difference is that Armour does not gain Wear when in close combat.  A knockdown test still applies if the character takes an entire Wound level of Damage in one round.

 

ARMOUR

Armour: the one thing stopping that bullet from entering your chest. Armour in the Matrix is constructed in the Construct according to the wearer's specifications; like weapons, they more complicated and useful the piece of armour, the more load it consumes.


Constructing Armour.

There are two parts to constructing a piece of armour; its shape, and its material. There are several armour shapes, as follows:

Jacket – your everyday, open-fronted, upper-body garment.  Covers arms and torso.  They may be made from any kind of material, and may be plated.

Duster – the longer version of the jacket, the duster covers the upper legs in addition to the torso and arms.  May be made from any kind of material, and may be plated.  Any weapons hidden under a Duster gain +1 to their Conceal rating.

Thrasher Suit – essentially a jumpsuit made from damage-resistant materials.  Popular with the courier crowd.  Covers all areas except the head. May be made from any kind of material, but may only be plated with plastic, either Regular or Moulded.  Unless plated, Thrasher Suits do not accrue Speed penalties due to layering.

Body Armour – custom-tailored armour, designed to be undetectable under clothing.  It covers all areas except the head.  It may only be made from ProMax, Kevlar or KevlarMax, and may only be plated with Moulded plastic.  Body Armour does not accrue Speed penalties when layering armour.

Longcoat/Greatcoat – the full-length, floor-brushing coat.  Covers all areas except the head.  May be made from any material, and may be plated.  Automatically reduces the character’s Speed by 1, but on the upside, it adds 2 to the Conceal of any weapon placed underneath it.

Skirt/Pants – covers the upper legs (for short varieties) or the entire leg (for longer ones).  May be made out of any material, but cannot be plated.

Helmet – a rarity for Freeminds, helmets cover the all-important head.  May be made of any material, and may be (and usually are) plated.

Boots – the all-important shoe factor.  Boots come in ankle-, knee-(Lower leg) and calf-(all Leg)length.  Calf-length boots automatically reduce the character’s Speed by 1 – have you ever tried to run in those things?  May be made of any material (usually Leather), and may be plated.

Shirt – a lighter version of personal protection, sliding in somewhere between Body Armour and the Jacket.  Covers the Torso and arms.  May be made of any material, and may be plated.

Vest – a stripped-down version of the Shirt.  Covers the Torso only.  May be made out of any material, and may be plated.

 

Now that you’ve chosen what the armour protects, it's time to see how well it does its job. The player must choose the composition of the armour, and whether or not it is plated.  There are several types of material which the piece may be constructed from:

Ordinary Cloth: what most clothing is made out of. Not too good at stopping things, but light on the Load.

Heavy Cloth: the rugged stuff that goes into the construction of heavy coats and cheap riot gear.

Ballistic Cloth: a combination weave of Kevlar (spider silk) and ordinary cloth.  The result is cheap and relatively sturdy.

Leather: good old tanned hide.

Ballistic Leather: hide reinforced with Kevlar.

ProMax material: tightly-woven material designed to resist attacks from knives.

Kevlar: material woven from spider silk, which protects well against ballistic attacks, at the cost of being susceptible to blade attacks.

KevlarMax: a Kevlar/ProMax composite offering the best of both worlds.

Plating adds rigid protection to the piece of armour by adding plates over vital areas, like the chest, back and forearms.  There are two types: Regular, and Moulded.

Regular plates are produced en masse, and hence are cheaper to program – lighter on the Load.

Moulded plates are custom-fitted to the character, which reduces Speed penalties for the type of plating by one.  On the down side, they are more detailed, requiring more Load runtime.

Plastic plating consists of plates of hard plastic, about 1cm thick.  While bulky, it won’t set off MAD scanners.

Ceramic plating is what most low-threat enforcement vests contain.  Ceramic plates are similar to those used on the Space Shuttle, to ablate friction and the force of re-entry; hence, they provide greater protection against Heat attacks.  Steel plates are the best armour money can buy.  Unfortunately, the protection comes at a cost: they reduce the character’s movement drastically, as well as setting off any MAD scanners the character may walk through.

<div align="center">

Material Type

Ballistic

Blade

Impact

Heat

Ordinary Cloth

-

-

-

-

Heavy Cloth

-

1

-

1

Ballistic Cloth

1*

-

-

1

Leather

2

1

1

2

Ballistic Leather

3*

1

1

2

ProMax material

2

3*

-

2

Kevlar

4*

2

1

2

KevlarMax

4*

3*

1

3

Plating Type

Ballistic

Blade

Impact

Heat

Trauma Plates – Ceramic

2

2

2*

3*

Trauma Plates – Steel

3

3

3*

2

Trauma Plates – Plastic

1

1

2*

1

</div>

Armour weights tend to be ignored in the game, to an extent.  If a character is wearing more than one plated piece of armour, subtract one from their Speed for plastic plates, two for ceramic, and three for steel.  This counts for every piece of plated armour; so a character wearing a bulletproof vest (regular ceramic plates) and a ceramic-plated long-coat would have their Speed reduced by 4.  They would also sound like a xylophone if they tried to run.

Layering armour: layering armour reduces the effectiveness of the layers. If the character layers armour, only one article is at full value; the others are reduced by half, with Absorption Values rounded down to the nearest whole number, and Armour Values rounded down to the nearest 10%.  Also, layering more than two articles of armour automatically reduces the character’s Speed by 1 per extra layer.

 

LOAD and Armour

Two things determine the Load of a piece of armour: its type, and its composition.  Each type of armour has a basic Load, and its composite pieces (its material, plus any plating) become a modifier to this basic value.  All totals are rounded down to the nearest whole number.

Armour Type

Load

Material Modifier

Ankle-length Boot

10

Normal Cloth

0.5

Calf-length Boot

20

Heavy Cloth

1

Thigh-length Boot

25

Ballistic Cloth

1.25

Body Armour

40

Leather

1.25

Thrasher Suit

30

Ballistic Leather

1.5

Skirt/Pants, Short

15

ProMax Material

1.75

Skirt/Pants, Long

20

Kevlar

1.75

Vest

15

KevlarMax

2

Jacket

25

Plating Modifiers

Duster

40

Plastic

1.5

Greatcoat

50

Ceramic

2

Helmet

20

Steel

2.5

 

- Moulded

+0.5

 

So, a pair of average combat boots (leather, Ankle-length) would have a Load of (10×1.25=)12, whereas a KevlarMax suit of Body Armour with moulded plastic trauma plates would have a Load of (40×2=80, 80×2=)160.

 

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